Shriners Items
The Shriners fraternal organization commissioned champagne glasses and other items for its annual conventions in the early part of the 1900s. Just who made them is the question. Some are found with U.S. Glass labels but in a 1996 book by Chas West Wilson, grandson of the founder of Westmoreland who was an avid member of Shriners, the pieces are credited to Westmoreland. I'll leave the settling of the dispute to others, but see below.

1904 Atlantic city mug, golden fish handle, image of woman holding sword

Clear, 300 (2016)

1905 Niagra Falls mug, three handles

Clear, 140 (2003), 150 (2004), 25 (2005)

1906 Los Angelos 5-inch plate

Clear, 70 (2016)

1908 St. Paul goblet glass (3rd from left)

Clear, 100 (2004)

Lavender?, 100 (2014)

Ruby (or cranberry) flashing, 100 (2001), 350 (2004), 105 (2012), 85 (2016)

1908 St. Paul sheath of wheat toothpick holder or shot glass

Ruby (or cranberry) flashing, 85 (2003), 130 (2006)

1908 Pittsburgh toothpick holder, gold decor

Ruby flashing, 150 (2007)

1909 Louisville tobacco leaf (2nd from left)

Clear, 30 (2012), 30, 35 (both 2014), 30, 45 (both 2015), 15, 20, 30, 40 (all 2016)

Clear, US Glass paper label, 125 (2004)

1909 Los Angeles toothpick holder or shot glass

Ruby (or cranberry) flashing, 150 (1994), 50 (2002)

1910 New Orleans alligators (far right)

Clear, 25 (2011), 55 (2013), 30, 40, 45 (all 2014), 40, 85 (both 2015), 20, 25, 50 (all 2016)

1911 Rochester painted camel rider (left)

Clear, 25, 85 (both 2011), 45, 55 (both 2013), 55 (2014), 55 (2015), 30, 80 (both 2016)

Updated 1/22/2017

Here's a photo of a paper label on the bottom of a 1909 Louisville champagne glass. It clearly shows it identified as US Glass. However, I have a problem with this label. This is not the style used on labels in 1909. The type circling a center logo is a graphic technique developed after the 1950s. Furthermore, the "S" superimposed over the "U" is also a technique not common 100 years ago. Not to say it couldn't have been done back then, but I doubt it.