Dreibus Parfait Sweets, Northwood

Much like the other Northwood 6-inch advertising pieces, this one has the script lettering "Dreibus Parfait Sweets" in the center with two flowers--one on the right and one lower left.

Bowls, ruffled

Amethyst, 950 (2007), 500 (2008), 500 (2012), 350 (2015), 350 (2016)

Horehound, 750 (2002), 230 (2012)

Lavender, 450 (2007), 275 (2009), 475 (2017)

Plates, double handgrip (card tray)

Amethyst, 600, 625 (both 2001), 325 (2011), 500 (2015)

Lavender, 500, 750 (both 2009), 550 (2010), 300 (2017)

Plates, single handgrip
Amethyst, 475 (2007), 600 (2008), 850 (2009), 475, 700 (both 2012),
   450 (2013), 275 (2016), 550 (2017)

Lavender, 1,200, 1,600 (both 2006), 675 (2009), 325 (2010), 700 (2017)

Plates, flat

Amethyst, 450, 525, 650 (all 2007), 650 (2009), 750, 850 (both 2011),
   875 (2013), 575, 750 (both 2015), 1,450 (2017)

Horehound, 475 (2017)

Lavender, 1,200 (2006), 550 (2009), 400 (2010), 550 (2012)


Don Chamberlain, writing the March 2011 issue of the ICGA Pump, says: Anton C. Dreibus was a German immigrant who first went to Chicago and was in the toy business with Schweitzer & Beer. He became a successful jobber of candy in Chicago. He next moved to Omaha with Brothers Michael and Jacob Kopp. There they formed Kopp, Dreibus & Company in 1884. That partnership ended in 1888 and it became the Dreibus Candy Company. They were originally located at 1106 Farnum and 1316 Jones St. in Omaha.

In 1906, Mr. Dreibus built a three-story building at 508, 510, and 512 South 9th Street. This business was so successful that in 1919 he added two stories to the same building. One side of the building had an ad that, "Yucatan Bum, 70 cents a box" and on the other side said "Dreibus Candy Company, Manufacturers of High Grade Confections, 508 -- 510 -- 512 South 9th Street, Jackson 4272" According to my research, the building appears to have been where the Embassy Suites sits today.

Parfait Sweets was a candy manufactured by the company with a "dark sweet coating." Parfait Sweets was not a part of the company name.

The company closed after the death of Anton in 1937 when it was taken over by his elderly brothers. The pressures of the Depression probably contributed to its downfall.

Updated 7/22/2017